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2 ~ Gone With the Wind

14 Feb

Margaret Mitchell wrote a moving, powerful, exciting and colorful book about a young woman and her trials and tribulations during the Civil War period of our history. Her book was published in 1936 and won the Pulitzer Prize in 1937. It was the only book that Mitchell published in her lifetime, but it became one of the best-selling American novels of the 20th century, surpassed only by Valley of the Dolls in the late 1960s. Less than 4 years after it’s release Mitchell’s book came to life and was forever immortalized in David O. Selznick’s theatrical masterpiece, Gone With the Wind.

Named as the 4th top 100 American films of the 20th Century, Gone with the Wind is a masterpiece in film. Both in cinematography, music score, visual effects, direction and acting. No other movie is better known that Gone With the Wind, except for maybe my # 1 pic. Today almost 70 years after it’s release it is as the characters and the story were not fictional characters but real live humans living during a time of American tragedy. It forever etched the names Clark Gable, Viven Leigh, Scarlett and Rhett inot our vocabularies and histories. It gave us a look at the roles (however un-real) of the effect slaves had on the south, and it also presented a female as a heroic figure for possibly the first time. The character of Scarlett is the most memorable heroine in film history and quite likely the greatest feminine role ever adapted for the screen from a novel. Vivien Leigh’s performance is no less than spectacular. It was Miss Leigh’s great fortune to have played not only Scarlett but A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE’s Blanche DuBois, who is arguably the greatest role ever written for a stage play. Gone With the Wind changed the way movies were made, and the way movies were watched.

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Posted by on February 14, 2007 in 10 Favorite Films of the 1930's, 30's, Classic

 

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